Login
Register

Home

About Us

Diagnoses

Treatments

Classes

Resources

Media

Testimonials

Blog

Account

Media
Register
Whitney Port suffered from postpartum stress urinary incontinence
Abby Moore of the website mindbodygreen reached out to me about postpartum stress urinary incontinence and I was glad to offer my advice. Here is a brief synopsis of the article along with a link to the full article below.

Heather Jeffcoat, DPT

Postpartum Stress Urinary Incontinence Affects Many

Motherhood ushers in a lot of changes, both emotionally and physically, for those who take on the role. While it can lead to a new sense of purpose and feelings of unconditional love, it can simultaneously lead to worry, physical exhaustion, and, in the case of multi-hyphenate talent Whitney Port: bladder leakage. 

When I started working out after having [my son] Sonny, I experienced bladder leakage trying to do jumping jacks or any kind of cardio," Port tells mbg.

While postpartum stress urinary incontinence may not be one of the joys of having children, it is an incredibly common side effect—both from vaginal and cesarean deliveries. 

How does pregnancy affect the pelvic floor?

Although pelvic floor muscles stretch over 300% during vaginal delivery, being pregnant increases your risk of pelvic floor dysfunction regardless of how you deliver," physical therapist Heather Jeffcoat, DPT, explains.

The pregnancy itself causes postural and hormonal changes that increase the risk of bladder leaks."

Exercise, laughter, coughing, sneezing, bending, lifting, etc., can trigger these leaks—making them essentially unavoidable postpartum. As many as four in 10 women experience urinary incontinence after giving birth, and many of them (including Port) don't expect to.

I didn't really think much about my pelvic floor before becoming a mom," she tells mbg.

I think the terminology starts sparking when you get pregnant and you're about to have the baby."

After learning of its importance, Port began taking prenatal Pilates classes, focused on the core and the pelvic floor. And of course, following the birth, those exercises became even more top-of-mind.

To learn more about postpartum stress urinary incontinence continue to the full article here.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

Featured on InstaGram

What They Say About Us

  • Testimonials

    • Testimonial by S.H., age 24

      I just wanted to thank you for everything you've done for me for the past 19 months. I literally could not have reached my goals without you and your practice. You gave me the courage to keep moving forth with my treatment no matter how afraid and anxious I was. You were always there to answer questions and made this whole process so much easier than I expected it to be. It's because of you that my marriage is on the right track, that I can get pregnant and that this part of my life is finally...

      Read more Testimonial by S.H., age 24

  • Testimonials

    • Testimonial by A.W., age 32

      I wanted to let you know that my pelvic floor held strong and gave me no trouble whatsoever in my trail race this morning (12 miles)! In a way, I felt like I ran better than ever because my core feels so rock solid from all the exercises you have me doing. That was especially valuable on the technical downhill - I just flew down the trail because I had confidence in my balance and form. Thank you for helping me get back to doing what I love. -- A.W., age 32(completed Post-partum Renewal...

      Read more Testimonial by A.W., age 32

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

captcha